Japanese Words of the Day

  I’ve been studying the Japanese language, both symbolic and in words, and I’ll not be the first to say that it is way harder than it looks and isn’t too hard at the same time.

  As someone who comes from Spanish and English speaking households, when I look at the Japanese system of communication, I can spot some words that sound English, Spanish, and even French.

  For instance: when I was in my early teen years(at least, I think that’s when it was) I thought that the word “sayonara” was French. I knew that it meant “goodbye”, but I had no idea that it was actually Japanese.

  The language can be difficult to master and speak/write fluently for beginners, but practice makes perfect. I used to- and still do so on occasions to keep my mind sharp- stay up practicing my symbols, and how to put them together to form a sentence or phrase.

  I you know Spanish, then you’ll know that most of the times, a statement is what I call “reversed.” This means that you’ll say one thing in Spanish, and if you translate it directly into English, it’ll sound off or as if the verb came before the subject. The same rule often applies to Japanese statements: Bandodesu za• Gazetto– or The GazettE is a band.

  Bando=Band, Desu=Is, Za•=The, and Gazetto=Gazette. Normally, you’d think that it’d be “Za• Gazetto desu bando”, but that’s incorrect. In this case, “band(bando) and is(desu)” are linked and followed by “the(za•) and Gazetto(Gazette).

  Also, if you take the words band and Gazette, you’ll notice that the Japanese form of these words are very similar to that of the English form. Use the knowledge that you have of other languages and combine it in your efforts to pursue a new language.

  Good luck to you if you’re currently trying to learn another language. Try your best and don’t be discouraged!

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